GS Artists: Alina Skorohoda

Alina Skorohoda’s artwork explores the notion of woman’s duty to the world. She responds to the feelings of obligation that haunt women everywhere, using domestic objects in her work; through altering these objects, she questions attitudes, fears and unwritten rules which have formed a hostile environment for women and their behavior within it, and the division between private (domestic) and public spheres.

She explores the problem of the lack of health warnings around the marketing of products dangerous to women’s health. Using heavy materials she creates a feel of heaviness to visually represent the heaviness and burden of wearing stereotypical women’s clothing and shoes. These objects are not everyday wear but the tools for social communication that are worn to impress, not for comfort.

Her work focuses on the unfamiliar term “topophobia” in relation to domestic space, referring to a fear of a specific space; in the context of this practice the fear of place is examined through feminist art practice which explores the power structures within domestic situations.

She employs the phrase ‘mental load’ as a means to describe the increasing pressure on female identity to strive for both equality and the feminine ideal. The phrase mental load has culturally been used to describe the mental pressures males experience at work and therefore appropriating this phrase becomes an interesting method to deconstruct this patriarchal association.

Skorohoda’s works use mixed media, video, installation, and everyday housekeeping objects to evoke the burden of meeting the expectations from others of stereotypical female appearance and behaviour.

Through Alina’s skillful work, particularly in photography and film, I can experience the feelings of being ethereal, unreal, ghostly, filled with foreboding, carrying strain yet barely existing, gliding through a world where everyone seems busy and there are so many tasks to do, so many places to go. Alienation and insignificance seem to be the lot of the woman, yet the connection to simple practical implements like brooms and mops anchor her in a world in which she barely belongs and from which she may not be able to escape. Like the women she portrays, who venture across urban landscapes, country roads and wide seas, I can want to yell out, to take my own power, to act on the environment. But bound into the muted silence of my own existence, I will find satisfaction in the spirit-life. Not sure if this is the way Alina wants us to see her work – I suspect it can bear being viewed through different prisms. I like particularly the way the sea comes into the foreground, the incoming tide resplendent no doubt with symbolic meaning.

Rhoda Thomas, poet

GS Artists: Melissa Rodrigues

Melissa Rodrigues‘ work uses a variety of materials to explore issues of displacement, belonging, and cultural identity, exploring aspects concerning the movement of people across the world.
Immigration for Rodrigues means more than laws, rules, and bureaucracy; it is centrally about awareness and maintenance of equality, integrity, sense of belonging and diversity within.
Rodrigues’ work has developed with the notion of cultural identity and aims to explore and research the African descendants in diaspora, who due to living in Western cultural and societal structures are not fully aware of their ancestors’ histories but continue suffering the consequences of that same historical construction; the way they are seen and consequently see themselves is still entrenched in the bases of Western historical agenda.
Rodrigues seeks to understand the impacts of this “missing history” on people’s lives, since according to Walter Benjamin “there is no document of a civilisation that is not at the same time a document of barbarism”, having in mind that history is written by and for the victorious (dominant potency).

Rodrigues recognises that globalisation, mixture of cultures, and trade plays an important role in the confusion of one’s understanding of self and self-worth in the Western world; for that reason Rodrigues’ research in time turned to a new material, textile, as a piece that plays an important role in collective identity. Rodrigues has been exploring and researching on the routes these pieces of cloth take throughout history, their importance in our understanding of self as members of social groups, and the misconceptions about them.
In July 2019, Rodrigues graduated BA (Hons) from University of Wales Trinity Saint David with 1 st class qualification in Fine Art, . She is currently doing post-graduate studies, MA Photography, at the same institution.
A myriad of artists has influenced and continue influencing Rodrigues’ practice, including Yinka Shonibare, Kara walker, Sonia Boyce, Grada Kilomba, Sidney Cerqueira, Arthur Jafa, Zenele Muholi among others.

GS Artists: Jeremy Gluck

I’M FREE ALREADY, 2020, Text-based art

I conceal what I reveal

I reveal what I conceal

MY GENIUS HAS NO SOUL, 2020

Brave No World, 2020
Manifesto of Nonceptual Art, 2017

Jeremy Gluck mainly works with contemporary strategies. By rejecting an objective truth and global cultural narratives, Gluck creates work in which a fascination with the clarity of content and an uncompromising attitude towards conceptual and minimal art often collides with ambiguity and concealment. The work is aloof and systematic and a cool and neutral imagery is used, obscuring a subtext speaking to process as practice.

Jeremy Gluck Axisweb

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Owen Griffiths

Owen Griffiths – Artist At Work

Owen Griffiths is the latest in our program of professional artists that use the gallery as their studio. Owen will use the space to explore alternative ways of mapping. In the gallery, he will be drawing large-scale works that connect to the wider mapping theme of Owen’s practice. This 3 week residency prepares the ground for a future large scale workshop and continued conversation later in the year.

Owen Griffiths’ social practice and research is connected to land use, urbanism, community food systems and ideas of challenging normative urban design practices. Developing democratic and equitable processes is central to his work with people and communities. He sees community land projects and alternative models of ownership as vital in our work to re-imagine the future of our cities and environments.
Griffiths studied for his MFA with Nils Norman at the radical alternative pedagogic space The School of Walls and Space at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Copenhagen.
He is a Creative Wales Ambassador to the Arts Council of Wales and a British Council USA Fellow, both of which have enabled him to research land use and community growing networks across USA and Europe.
Griffiths has worked with Cultural Olympiad Wales, Common Ground, National Museum Wales, Gentle/Radical, Artes Mundi, Swansea Asylum Seekers Group, Trevallis Homes, Valleys Kids, British Council USA, Natural Resources Wales, National Trust, PEAK Cymru, HMP Prisons Services, Arts Council Wales, Social Sculpture Research Unit, Engage Cymru, Design Commission for Wales, Wales Arts International.
Griffiths also works as a consultant and as a workshop leader/facilitator for culture/heritage organisations across the UK.
He is a member of Scandinavian based research collectives ATB and Office in Bed.